Monday, May 28, 2018

Ellicott City, Baltimore region devastated by 'once-every-1,000-years flood'

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan late Sunday night declared a state of emergency in Ellicott City after a massive rainstorm caused flash flooding that destroyed businesses and submerged cars in what he called a “once-every-1,000-years flood.” News outlets showed photos and video of sudden, violent floodwaters surging down Main Street in Ellicott City, some 13 miles west of Baltimore. The community, set along the west bank of Maryland's Patapsco River, was also stricken by deadly flash flooding in July 2016. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/05/28/ellicott-city-baltimore-region-devastated-by-once-every-1000-years-flood.html

Saturday, May 05, 2018

More Than 100 Wild Horses Dead Amid Southwest Drought

More than 100 wild horses were discovered dead in Arizona due to worsening drought conditions in America's Southwest region, officials said this week. The animals were found by a pond near Grey Mountain—an unincorporated community in Coconino County, Arizona. The 111 dead horses typically consumed the pond's water, but drier conditions made water scarce. "Due to drought conditions, they became stuck in the mud and were too weak from thirst to climb out," Russell Begaye, president of the Navajo Nation tribe, said Tuesday via Twitter. "This is the beginning. The Navajo Nation has over 70,000 feral horses." http://www.newsweek.com/wild-horses-dead-amid-drought-912012

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

‘Bomb Cyclone’: Snow and Bitter Cold Blast the Northeast

Boston’s Long Wharf area became a slushy mess when a three-foot tidal surge pushed floodwaters into buildings and down the steps of the Aquarium mass transit station. Firefighters rescued one person who was trapped in a car that had water nearly to its door handles. “This is the first time I’ve ever seen the water come this high in the downtown area,” Joseph Finn, the city’s fire commissioner, said as the wind whipped heavy snow through the air. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/04/us/winter-snow-bomb-cyclone.html

The extreme heat in Australia is causing bats' brains to fry

On Sunday, temperatures topping 113 degrees Fahrenheit were recorded around Sydney — making it the metropolis' hottest day since 1939. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2018/01/09/extreme-heat-australia-causing-bats-brains-fry/1018495001/

Deadly rains in Southern California send rivers of mud into homes, trigger fire, flooding

"Rainfall rates were unprecedented,” the National Weather Service said in a statement read at a news conference in Santa Barbara County Tuesday afternoon. A rain gauge at the Carpinteria Fire Department recorded ½ inch of rain in just 5 minutes, according to the weather service. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/rains-southern-california-send-rivers-mud-homes-trigger-fire-n836016

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Deadly Wildfires Prompt Longest Red Flag Warning In History

This time around firefighters are facing a seemingly insurmountable battle — the “Thomas” fire in Santa Barbara, Summerland and Montecito has burned more than 395 square miles, and is currently only 35% contained. It has claimed the lives of at least two people, one a firefighter, and has destroyed more than 900 buildings. This fire has contributed to an unprecedented 13-day long string of red-flag warnings from the National Weather Service. https://whowhatwhy.org/2017/12/16/deadly-wildfires-prompt-longest-red-flag-warning-history/

California fire: Resident says neighborhood looks like 'war zone'

The fire is so massive that more than 8,400 firefighters are working around the clock to save lives and contain it. It's bigger in acreage than New York City, and has turned neighborhoods to piles of soot and concrete as it churns through the area. http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/17/us/california-fires/index.html

Sunday, September 03, 2017

Fires rage through West; Los Angeles declares state of emergency

San Francisco, meanwhile, set a heat record for the day, hitting 94 degrees before noon. By mid-afternoon, it was 101 in the coastal city — hotter than Phoenix. With an all-time high of 106 on Friday, it became just the third time since the 1870s that San Francisco had back-to-back triple-digit days. Temperatures reached 115 south of the city. It was a rare heat wave at a time of year that San Francisco residents usually call "Fogust" for its cloudy chill. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/09/03/fires-rage-through-west-los-angeles-declares-state-emergency.html

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Intense Flooding Kills 800 People in South Asia, Displaces a Million More

One-third of Bangladesh, for example, is submerged under floodwaters, and more than 45,000 homes in the country have been destroyed. “This is not normal,” Reaz Ahmed, the director-general of the country’s Department of Disaster Management, told CNN. “Floods this year were bigger and more intense than previous years.”, The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, a humanitarian group, said the flooding in Bangladesh is the worst the country has ever seen. http://e360.yale.edu/digest/intense-flooding-kills-800-people-in-south-asia-displaces-a-million-more

Monday, August 28, 2017

Full extent of Harvey’s aftermath starts to come into chilling focus

The full extent of Harvey’s aftermath started to come into chilling focus Monday in Houston and across much of Central Texas, as rain measured in feet, not inches, overwhelmed lakes, rivers and bayous, leaving several people dead and thousands displaced in a weather disaster described as “beyond anything experienced.” “A flood of this magnitude is an 800-year event, and it exceeds the design specification of our levees,” said Fort Bend County County Judge Robert Herbert in a statement Monday. https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/full-extent-of-harveys-aftermath-starts-to-come-into-chilling-focus/2017/08/27/1b2b184a-8b56-11e7-8df5-c2e5cf46c1e2_story.html?utm_term=.11495bc561db

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Drenched: How L.A. went from bone-dry to 216% of normal rainfall in four months

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-rain-record-la-20170123-story.html Sunday’s huge storm — which dumped nearly 4 inches of rain in some areas — is part of a wetter trend that began in the fall. Since Oct. 1, downtown L.A. has received more than 13 inches of rain -- 216% of normal for this period, which the National Weather Service said was 6.26 inches. It’s a remarkable turnaround

Friday, January 06, 2017

The crack in this Antarctic ice shelf just grew by 11 miles. A dramatic break could be imminent.

An enormous rift in one of Antarctica’s largest ice shelves grew dramatically over the past month, and a chunk nearly the size of Delaware could break away as soon as later this winter, British scientists reported this week. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2017/01/06/the-crack-in-this-antarctic-ice-shelf-just-grew-by-11-miles-a-break-could-be-imminent/?utm_term=.d29049377adf

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

How big droughts, forest fires could be the new normal in Appalachia

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/widespread-forest-fires-claims-may-signal-new-normal-appalachian-mountains/ How big droughts, forest fires could be the new normal in Appalachia

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

After Rain Deluge, Rare Winter Floods on Mississippi River

Warm and wet weather over the last several weeks followed by storms that brought a deluge of rain in recent days have produced a severe threat of flooding along the Mississippi River, where water could reach record high levels soon in some places. The winter flooding is unusual and could portend even worse problems in the spring depending on weather the rest of the season. Here's a look at what is prompting the concern: RECORD CRESTS The sudden flooding along the Mississippi River is both rare and historic. At a time of the year when both precipitation and the river level typically are well below normal, there could be record crests in some places along the Mississippi. http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/rain-deluge-rare-winter-floods-mississippi-river-35986844

Sunday, December 27, 2015

The Siege of Miami

The city of Miami Beach floods on such a predictable basis that if, out of curiosity or sheer perversity, a person wants to she can plan a visit to coincide with an inundation. Knowing the tides would be high around the time of the “super blood moon,” in late September, I arranged to meet up with Hal Wanless, the chairman of the University of Miami’s geological-sciences department. Wanless, who is seventy-three, has spent nearly half a century studying how South Florida came into being. From this, he’s concluded that much of the region may have less than half a century more to go. http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/12/21/the-siege-of-miami

Flooding forces mass evacuations in South America

(CNN)Floods displaced more than 150,000 people in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Paraguay this week after days of torrential rains blamed on El Niño. In Paraguay, which was the hardest-hit, more than 130,000 people were evacuated. In Alberdi city, residents fled as walls holding back water appeared on the verge of collapse, authorities said. Argentina had 20,000 evacuees, half of them from Concordia city, which President Mauricio Macri will visit Sunday. http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/27/americas/south-america-flooding/

Alabama Braces for Flooding After Tornado, Severe Weather

Alabama was on alert Saturday for more extreme flooding, a day after a tornado touched down in Birmingham and left a two-square-mile swath of destruction. Heavy rains and flooding continue to hammer the state — along with much of the Southeast — in a deluge of downpours since Wednesday. http://www.nbcnews.com/news/weather/tornado-hits-birmingham-severe-southern-weather-continues-n486011

UK floods: Extra soldiers sent to stricken areas

Leeds has also been badly affected, with 1,000 homes flooded, but the city's council leader said the government had been warned "a major flood... was a catastrophe waiting to happen". "While now is the time to focus on the wellbeing of our residents and the condition of their properties and possessions, we will again be calling on the government for further significant investment in additional flood defences," Judith Blake added. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35184999